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Forestway Optometry Glenrose

Independently owned   –  Highly Experienced   –  Excellence in Service

Serving the Frenchs Forest Community
since 1992.

Serving the Frenchs Forest Community for over 26 years.

We provide

Full Optometry Services

At Forestway Optometry, we deliver a highly personalised service coupled with a great range of competitively priced eyewear, including contact lenses and the highest quality optical lenses, from the most reputable laboratories. 

We also offer bulk billed eye tests (under Medicare rules), on the spot health fund claims for all the major Health Funds (preferred suppliers to CBHS), “No Gap” packages, discount prescription sunglass packages, and a great range of children’s eyewear.

Eye Health

Regular eye exams should be part of your healthcare regime.  So take an active role in looking after your vision by having an eye test at least every 2 years.

 

Children’s Vision

It is important to have a child’s eyes examined before they start school. Then have them retested at least every two years thereafter.

 

Eyewear

At Forestway Optometry we offer the highest quality, competitively priced frames, lenses & sunglasses ​for everyone and every occasion. 

 

Contact Lenses

Contact lenses are suitable for almost everyone who wears glasses. Book a Contact Lens Consultation with us to see if contact lenses are right for you.

 

May Is Macula Month

1st – 31st May 2019

If you are over 50 you are at a higher risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Order a FREE information kit from Macular Disease Foundation Australia’s National Helpline 1800 111 709 or click here

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What does an Optometrist do ?

Optometrists are health professionals who are qualified to examine your eyes for vision and eye disorders, and for health problems involving the eyes. They can treat these problems as well as prescribe, supply and fit optical aids.
Optometrists also provide expert advice on eye care and eye health.

Optometrists provide a range of eye-related services

Optometrists have a university qualification and must be registered with the Optometrists Registration Board to practise. Optometrists are qualified to:

  • diagnose eye disorders and diseases (such as cataract and glaucoma)
  • pick up health disorders involving the eyes (such as diabetes and thyroid problems)
  • examine eyes for vision disorders
  • prescribe, fit and supply glasses and contact lenses
  • analyse and treat eye coordination and focusing disorders
  • prescribe other specialised optical aids
  • contribute to the care of the partially sighted

Many optometrists are qualified to prescribe therapeutic drugs to treat a range of common eye conditions.

Most eye testing can be provided under Medicare, and prescribed treatments are generally available on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.

Advice provided by Optometrists

Optometrists can also provide expert advice on:

  • occupational eye safety and vision requirements
  • general eye and vision protection
  • aftercare for contact lens use
  • appropriate spectacle lens materials and coatings
  • sunglasses
  • sports vision
  • vision-related learning disabilities
  • lighting

Consultation with an Optometrist

A standard eye examination includes screening for all common eye diseases, such as glaucoma and cataracts. The Optometrists will also:

  • talk to you and develop your case history
  • examine your eyes and related structures for any vision problems, signs of eye disease or other abnormalities
  • assess your eyes for a focusing disorder such as myopia, astigmatism or presbyopia
  • measure your eye movement and coordination
  • refer you, if required, to your local doctor or ophthalmologist (an eye specialist who performs eye surgery and treats eye diseases)

Optometrists Association NSW

Over 90 percent of Optometrists in New South Wales are members of the Optometrists Association. Association members take part in continuing professional education. They also:

  • agree to abide by the OAA Code of Ethics, ensuring a responsible and well-disciplined profession
  • are accountable for the quality of professional services offered
  • are willing to talk to interested groups
  • use the latest technology and information from Australia and overseas
  • promote vision safety in the workplace, the home and in sports

Where to get help

  • Your local Optometrist
  • Optometrists Association NSW (02) 9712 2199

Things to remember

  • Optometrists are qualified to provide a range of services.
  • Optometrists can diagnose and treat eye disorders and vision problems, prescribe and dispense glasses and contact lenses, and provide expert advice on eye care.
  • Optometrists are registered health practitioners.

What does an Optometrist do ?

Optometrists are health professionals who are qualified to examine your eyes for vision and eye disorders, and for health problems involving the eyes. They can treat these problems as well as prescribe, supply and fit optical aids.
Optometrists also provide expert advice on eye care and eye health.

Optometrists provide a range of eye-related services

Optometrists have a university qualification and must be registered with the Optometrists Registration Board to practise. Optometrists are qualified to:

  • diagnose eye disorders and diseases (such as cataract and glaucoma)
  • pick up health disorders involving the eyes (such as diabetes and thyroid problems)
  • examine eyes for vision disorders
  • prescribe, fit and supply glasses and contact lenses
  • analyse and treat eye coordination and focusing disorders
  • prescribe other specialised optical aids
  • contribute to the care of the partially sighted

Many optometrists are qualified to prescribe therapeutic drugs to treat a range of common eye conditions.

Most eye testing can be provided under Medicare, and prescribed treatments are generally available on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.

Advice provided by Optometrists

Optometrists can also provide expert advice on:

  • occupational eye safety and vision requirements
  • general eye and vision protection
  • aftercare for contact lens use
  • appropriate spectacle lens materials and coatings
  • sunglasses
  • sports vision
  • vision-related learning disabilities
  • lighting

Consultation with an Optometrist

A standard eye examination includes screening for all common eye diseases, such as glaucoma and cataracts. The Optometrists will also:

  • talk to you and develop your case history
  • examine your eyes and related structures for any vision problems, signs of eye disease or other abnormalities
  • assess your eyes for a focusing disorder such as myopia, astigmatism or presbyopia
  • measure your eye movement and coordination
  • refer you, if required, to your local doctor or ophthalmologist (an eye specialist who performs eye surgery and treats eye diseases)

Optometrists Association NSW

Over 90 percent of Optometrists in New South Wales are members of the Optometrists Association. Association members take part in continuing professional education. They also:

  • agree to abide by the OAA Code of Ethics, ensuring a responsible and well-disciplined profession
  • are accountable for the quality of professional services offered
  • are willing to talk to interested groups
  • use the latest technology and information from Australia and overseas
  • promote vision safety in the workplace, the home and in sports

Where to get help

  • Your local Optometrist
  • Optometrists Association NSW (02) 9712 2199

Things to remember

  • Optometrists are qualified to provide a range of services.
  • Optometrists can diagnose and treat eye disorders and vision problems, prescribe and dispense glasses and contact lenses, and provide expert advice on eye care.
  • Optometrists are registered health practitioners.

Frequently Asked Questions

To help you to better understand the key issues regarding eye health
please refer to the frequently asked questions below.

If the information you require is not available here please feel free to contact us directly.

What is an Astigmatism?

Astigmatism is a common and treatable eye condition which causes irregular focus.

The front surface of a normal eye is round like a football, but people with astigmatism have eyes shaped more like an oval rugby ball. This changes the path of light so that the image formed at the back of the eye is not sharply focused.

People with astigmatism will usually also be short or long sighted.

Learn More >>

What is Myopia or short sightedness?

Myopic (short-sighted) people cannot see clearly in the distance without glasses or contact lenses.

This is because of a focusing problem. Usually, light comes in through the lens and focuses on the retina at the back of the eye.  In myopia, the light is focused too far forward in the eye, in front of the retina, which causes things to look blurred in the distance.

Learn More >>

What is Hyperopia or long-sightedness?

Long sightedness or hyperopia is a common condition that affects the ability to focus. In a long-sighted eye, the light focuses behind the retina, blurring the image. If it is significant long-sightedness can cause vision problems, headaches and tiredness. Glasses, contact lenses and laser techniques are used to correct long-sightedness.

Learn More >>

What is Strabismus?

Strabismus occurs when the eyes are not correctly aligned and point in different directions when looking at an object. It is commonly known as ‘turned’, ‘lazy’ or ‘crossed’ eyes.

One eye or both eyes may turn either inward (esotropia), outward (exotropia), upward (hypertropia) or downward (hypotropia). Strabismus may be constant or intermittent.

What is Glaucoma?

A disease of the optic nerve, Glaucoma is usually associated with raised pressure inside your eye which squeezes the optic nerve and this in turn kills off the nerve fibres leading to sight loss.

Learn More >>

What does Amblyopia mean?

Amblyopia, commonly known as ‘lazy eye’, is the loss of vision caused by untreated strabismus. When a person with a strabismus looks at an object the brain receives two different images and this can confuse the brain. In children, the brain may learn to ignore the double image from the turned eye. This constant ignoring of the image from one eye during a child’s visual development can result in poor vision. Untreated, the vision will remain poor.

In most cases amblyopia can be very successfully treated up to the age of seven years, which is the end of the period of visual growth. It is therefore important to diagnose and treat this condition early on.

What is Age Related Macular Degeneration?

Age-related macular degeneration is one of the principal causes of blindness in older people in Australia. Age and family history are key risk factors, along with smoking; smoking cessation is the most important step patients can take to reduce their risk

AMD is most prevalent in people aged 50 years and over. Most people affected by AMD can see well enough to live independently, but have trouble with tasks that require the ability to see fine detail such as sewing, driving and reading. Recognising faces may be difficult too.

Learn More >>

What does having a Cataract mean?

A cataract is a common eye condition where the lens becomes progressively opaque, resulting in blurred vision. Having a cataract can be compared to a dirty camera lens or a foggy window.

Learn More >>

What causes Diabetic Retinopathy and how does it manifest?

The microvascular changes that occur throughout the body as a result of diabetes, also affect the eye. Microvascular changes within the retina are the most likely to adversely affect vision.

Learn More >>

What is Conjunctivitis or "Pink Eye"?

Conjunctivitis is an infection in the membrane lining the eye and inside the eyelids, called the conjunctiva. The eye becomes red, sticky or watery, and can be itchy, sore and uncomfortable. The infection can affect one eye or both eyes.

Learn More >>

What is Presbyopia?

This is an age-related condition whereby switching focus between distant and up-close objects becomes increasingly noticeable and difficult.

This occurs because the flexibility of our natural lens diminishes with age resulting in the need to wear different glasses for different focal lengths – near and far.

Learn More >>

What is Dry Eye?

If your eyes constantly feel dry, gritty or sandy, you may suffer from dry eye syndrome. Other symptoms include red, irritated or sore eyes, and difficulty wearing contact lenses. Sometimes, watery eyes can actually be a symptom of dry eyes, as the body produces excessive tears in response to the dryness and irritation.

Learn More >>

Peter Ramshaw Optometrist

Meet our Senior Optometrist & Owner

Peter Ramshaw

B.OPTOM, UNSW & M.C.OPTOM, UK

“I wanted a career that had a science aspect to it as well as being able to contribute and be useful. Optometry ticked all the boxes and has continued to for almost 40 years. Every patient is different and every day presents new and interesting challenges which is why I love being an optometrist .”

 

Meet our Optometrist

Barney Hon

OPTOMETRIST (B.OPTOM, UNSW, GRAD CERT OC THERA, UNSW)

“Optometry is an exciting field of healthcare with new techniques and treatments coming on stream all the time. I am very grateful to be able to work in such an innovative industry while at the same time providing people with one to one personalised care.”

 

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Trusted

Partners We Deal With

Our commitment to delivering the highest quality service is reflected in our choice of Partners. We are proud to work with the most reputable brands and in tandem with Australia’s leading eye care organisations to consistently reach the highest standards of care for all our clients.

Contact Info

Glenrose Village Shopping Centre
Shop 6, 56-58 Glen St
Belrose  NSW  2085

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